Apr 11, 2013

Live like a mighty river

Poet Ted Hughes wrote this letter to his son in 1986. He told him to live "like a mighty river." The letter is long and difficult, and it hurts like hell to read it.

"Everybody develops a whole armour of secondary self, the artificially constructed being that deals with the outer world, and the crush of circumstances. And when we meet people this is what we usually meet. And if this is the only part of them we meet we're likely to get a rough time, and to end up making 'no contact'," Hughes wrote.

"The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated," he said.

"And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

"And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy. End of sermon. As Buddha says: live like a mighty river. And as the old Greeks said: live as though all your ancestors were living again through you."

No comments:

Post a Comment